All I ask is a tall ship
and a star to steer her by
"There was a magic about the sea. People were drawn to it. People wanted to love by it, swim in it, play in it, look at it. It was a living thing that as as unpredictable as a great stage actor: it could be calm and welcoming, opening its arms to embrace it’s audience one moment, but then could explode with its stormy tempers, flinging people around, wanting them out, attacking coastlines, breaking down islands. It had a playful side too, as it enjoyed the crowd, tossed the children about, knocked lilos over, tipped over windsurfers, occasionally gave sailors helping hands."
Cecelia Ahern (via seabois)
19 hours ago with 440 notes — via tirnamara, © seabois


minutemanworld:

I love this painting. Jacob Lawrence’s Washington Crossing the Delaware. The Cubist influences are pretty strong and they really seem to help portray the idea of Washington’s soldiers as being beaten down with misery, cold, fatigue, and the stress of being driven clear from New York to the Delaware River. In the collection of the Met, and this is what they say about it:

Lawrence was one of America’s premiere storytellers for over sixty years. His subjects most often relate to the African-American experience, but sometimes he also addressed broader issues, depicting events from American history that tell about hardship, determination, and other challenges to the human spirit. Between 1954 and 1956 he produced thirty pictures about the American Revolution and Constitution, the Western Migration, the Civil War, and the Industrial Revolution that he collectively titled Struggle…From the History of the American People. Those images, plus thirty more never executed, were originally intended for publication with captions written by Lawrence’s friend, Jay Leyda (the project was never realized). 
The caption for this Washington Crossing the Delaware, the tenth panel in the Struggle series, relates: “We crossed the River at McKonkey’s Ferry 9 miles above Trenton…the night was excessively severe…which the men bore without the least murmur…—Tench Tilghman, 27 December 1776.” Lawrence abstractly interpreted this scene of war-weary soldiers huddled under blankets and three small rowboats on choppy waters as a series of jagged triangular forms punctuated by strong diagonal lines. Standing at the helm at lower left is their leader, General George Washington, his head and back bent stalwartly into the oncoming wind.

minutemanworld:

I love this painting. Jacob Lawrence’s Washington Crossing the Delaware. The Cubist influences are pretty strong and they really seem to help portray the idea of Washington’s soldiers as being beaten down with misery, cold, fatigue, and the stress of being driven clear from New York to the Delaware River. In the collection of the Met, and this is what they say about it:

Lawrence was one of America’s premiere storytellers for over sixty years. His subjects most often relate to the African-American experience, but sometimes he also addressed broader issues, depicting events from American history that tell about hardship, determination, and other challenges to the human spirit. Between 1954 and 1956 he produced thirty pictures about the American Revolution and Constitution, the Western Migration, the Civil War, and the Industrial Revolution that he collectively titled Struggle…From the History of the American People. Those images, plus thirty more never executed, were originally intended for publication with captions written by Lawrence’s friend, Jay Leyda (the project was never realized). 

The caption for this Washington Crossing the Delaware, the tenth panel in the Struggle series, relates: “We crossed the River at McKonkey’s Ferry 9 miles above Trenton…the night was excessively severe…which the men bore without the least murmur…—Tench Tilghman, 27 December 1776.” Lawrence abstractly interpreted this scene of war-weary soldiers huddled under blankets and three small rowboats on choppy waters as a series of jagged triangular forms punctuated by strong diagonal lines. Standing at the helm at lower left is their leader, General George Washington, his head and back bent stalwartly into the oncoming wind.

22 hours ago with 9 notes — via minutemanworld


Today was your first day too? Awesome.

Yeah - it was swell except for that one inattentive driver. I’m pleased with the teachers I have and I’m excited to see how this year turns out~

1 day ago with 2 notes


ahahaha 20 minutes into the first day of school, someone crunched the bumper of my parked car with their giant Jeep

1 day ago with 4 notes


fuckyeahvintageillustration:

'Gulliver's travels into several remote nations of the world' by Jonathan Swift; illustrated by Arthur Rackham. Published 1899 by Temple Press, London.

See the complete bok here.

1 day ago with 262 notes — via fuckyeahvintageillustration


charminglyantiquated:

Mermaid and pirates are my favorite things to draw.

1 day ago with 96 notes — via charminglyantiquated


villierscy:

So we all know about the (selective) online interactive manuscript of Les Miserables, with commentary, translation and attached relevant videos, right?

I thought it looked really cool and hadn’t seen anyone else talking about it yet.

Find it here (x)

More information here (x)

You can visit the Victor Hugo: Les Miserables – From Page to Stage exhibition at the State Library of Victoria (Australia) 18th July until 9th November.

2 days ago with 625 notes — via inspectorstars, © villierscy


edwarddespard:

the-fandoms-are-cool:

lesmisoz:

The original Les Miserables manuscript arrives in Melbourne.

jfc Hugo no wonder you had a stroke

Traveling to Melbourne this weekend to see the musical and the exhibition ….

2 days ago with 7,900 notes — via joachimmurat, © lesmisoz


minutemanworld:

A couple of days ago I [talked](http://minutemanworld.tumblr.com/post/93240908318/this-ship-was-discovered-underneath-the-world) about the ship that was discovered underneath the World Trade Center. Dendrochronologists had determined that the ship was built in 1773. 
Apparently  they were able to tell where the wood in the ship came from because they matched the tree rings in the wood to tree rings in the wood of Independence Hall. Furthermore the ship had worm holes in it, indicating that it had been active for many years (possibly two or three decades) and had spent some time in the Caribbean. 
Modern science is fantastically helpful to archaeologists because of this kind of detail. Even 20 years ago we may not have been able to learn this much about that ship, just that it was an 18th century ship. 
Pretty cool stuff in my opinion

minutemanworld:

A couple of days ago I [talked](http://minutemanworld.tumblr.com/post/93240908318/this-ship-was-discovered-underneath-the-world) about the ship that was discovered underneath the World Trade Center. Dendrochronologists had determined that the ship was built in 1773. 

Apparently  they were able to tell where the wood in the ship came from because they matched the tree rings in the wood to tree rings in the wood of Independence Hall. Furthermore the ship had worm holes in it, indicating that it had been active for many years (possibly two or three decades) and had spent some time in the Caribbean. 

Modern science is fantastically helpful to archaeologists because of this kind of detail. Even 20 years ago we may not have been able to learn this much about that ship, just that it was an 18th century ship. 

Pretty cool stuff in my opinion

3 days ago with 8 notes — via minutemanworld


HE CAME FROM THE SUN, FROM THE SEA, FROM THE VALLEYS AND TREES
AND BROUGHT WITH HIM DEATH, BALANCE, RESTORATION, AND REVELATION

3 days ago with 2,856 notes — via dewtts, © sadconfetti


otherhazards:

Text-Book of Seamanship, 1891

For all your historical and RP-worldbuilding nautical details.

4 days ago with 174 notes — via anchorfaced, © hnsa.org


"Whatever causes night in our souls may leave stars."
— Victor Hugo: Ninety-Three (via lathgerthas)
4 days ago with 43,271 notes — via ensignbeedrill, © betoseem


5 days ago with 108 notes — via jade-cooper, © blackheartedbrigand


vejiicakes:

we kept our secrets and rules [fullview at ao3]

Gift illustration for the wonderful drcalvin, based on her own deliciously dark Madeleine-era steampunk dystopia The Tale of Hundred-Faced Jean & the Brass-Hearted Inspector [x]

(Made as part of our second miseres exchange [x], for the request “Valjean, Javert; What-If Scenario”)

5 days ago with 1,953 notes — via philosophyoftherevolution, © vejiicakes


6 days ago with 235,615 notes — via joachimmurat, © cantgeddynuffofthatbass